Revelations Tarot – Tarot Review

The Revelations Tarot is essentially an RWS-inspired deck with a new approach to the art. It’s got the standard Tarot cards in the standard RWS order, but the cards show both upright and reversed interpretations on their face. Regardless of the card’s orientation during a spread, the reader can see both the aspect of the card in play and the potential lurking underneath. How cool is that?

I had to check it out.

The Deck

The Revelations Tarot comes as a set. There’s a sturdy box with a magnetic closure, a single well holding the cards with a ribbon to help lift them out (thank you thank you), and a companion book.

The Revelations Tarot set. The box is open sideways here, showing both the companion book and the cards. The ribbon is a lovely touch AND there are little gaps for your fingers. Huzzah!

The Revelations Tarot set. The box is open sideways here, showing both the companion book and the cards. The ribbon is a lovely touch AND there are little gaps for your fingers. Huzzah!

The cards are a touch smaller than standard. That makes them nice for small hands, I suppose, but I feel they’re too small to effectively convey the art. There is a lot going on here, and in my opinion a larger size would showcase that better. There’s also something about the finish my fingers don’t like – the cards “catch”, and feel a bit bumpy – but I don’t know if anyone else would even notice. They certainly shuffle well enough!

The reversible back of the card, flanked by two spread guide cards.

The reversible back of the card, flanked by two spread guide cards. Really, Llewellyn? You had two extra cards and this is what you chose to do with them? Ok then.

Let’s hit the book first. This is not at all written for beginners. There’s no “intro to Tarot” section, no Tarot history, nada. We get like a page and a half from the author about why he created the deck and then jump right into the card meanings.

Each of the Major cards gets about three pages worth of write-up while the Minors get two. I found this part to be particularly nice. An equal amount of space is used to explain upright and reversed meanings (not surprising, considering the deck!), and while the upright images have fairly standard associations the reversal explanations shine. These are creative, well-written, and entertaining to read. I quite enjoyed them!

The Fool and the Aces. The Aces are the only ones not getting much of a reverse difference, which makes a certain amount of sense considering.

The Fool and the Aces. The Aces are the only ones not getting much of a reversal difference art-wise.

The spread section was a huge disappointment, though. The whole rest of the book was apparently written for people who’ve been around Tarot for a bit, but the four spreads included were basic and frankly uninspired. The name of the deck is “Revelations Tarot” and there wasn’t a spread that played off of the title? What a wasted opportunity!

The art is unique. It’s done in a fantasy style with a kind of swirly stained-glass vibe. It’s really pretty, with lots of deep saturated colors. The images seem to carry the written card meanings quite well if you pay attention, too. I’ve put what are perhaps my favorite contrasting Majors below. They really do come across as two different cards depending on orientation!

A lineup of five cards from the Major Arcana: The Emperor, The Lovers, Strength, Death, and the Moon. The first row shows all the cards in an upright position while the bottom shows them all reversed.

Uprights are on the top, with reversals shown on the bottom. There is a clear difference between the two sides, giving us clear visual cues for both card orientations.

Using the Deck

Personally, I find it interesting just how quickly I adjusted to keeping my attention on only the top half of the card while reading. I was also kind of fascinated by how visually playing with the comparisons between the top and bottom gave new interpretation avenues to explore. 

All that being said, though, I don’t see myself keeping this deck for personal use. Quite a bit of the traditional symbolism in the cards has been lost to visually accommodate both card orientations, and I found myself ignoring the art entirely to give more complete interpretations. To be fair that might be because I’ve been shifting over to TdM-style decks for awhile now. These felt very “surface” and confining by comparison. Additionally, more of these cards fell flat for me artistically than I can handle in a deck I use regularly.

All in all my feelings about this deck are mixed. It’s not for me, but I can see where other people would really enjoy it. There’s not enough here to go on for beginners, and it’s a bit too basic for the advanced, but intermediate readers will likely find it a comfortable fit. It’s an excellent learning tool for those wanting to incorporate reversals into their readings but are unsure of where to start, too.

Want to see what the Revelations Tarot might reveal for you? Available here for about $30.

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