Rethinking Daily Tarot Draws

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot.

The Daily Tarot Draw is a ubiquitous practice in the Tarot community. It’s commonly recommended as a learning tool for those new to Tarot, and even more advanced folks often pull a card for direction or inspiration every morning. It’s an easy way to bring Tarot into our daily lives.

The technique is simple: we draw a card in the morning and ponder it throughout our day. Then, before sleep, we jot down the results of our pondering. In this way we focus on the cards one by one, allowing us to dig deeper into their meanings.

My Instagram post for the Two of Cups from Das Delphische Tarot, the German version of the Mythic Tarot.

My Instagram post for the Two of Cups from Das Delphische Tarot, the German version of the Mythic Tarot.

I’ve long been a fan of the Daily Draw, but over time I started getting less and less out of it.  Daily draws moved from “ooh, what could this mean today?” to “ah, better prep for that then!”. Questions became statements, and I grew bored.

I think that’s perfectly normal. The better we know the cards the less likely we are to question their meaning, right? Unfortunately, it’s the questioning aspect that makes this such a useful learning technique in the first place!

Thankfully, all it takes is a little twist to make the Daily Draw once again useful for even the most advanced Tarot students. Here are a few of my suggestions.

Change the Question

Most of us, when we do our daily reads, ask general questions about ourselves. “What do I need to know today?” “What situations do I need to prepare for?” “How will my event go?”

As an alternative, ask more specific questions about topics outside of ourselves. “What news story should I pay particular attention to today?” “What weather should I prepare for?” “What’s today’s office vibe?” Treat the one card draw as a mini-spread related to something specific and then record your results afterward. Stretch your limits and see how it goes!

Change the Deck (and Consult the Book!)

It’s easy for us to get so comfortable with an established deck that we stop really thinking about it. The fastest and easiest way to shake it up is to simply start working with a new deck. Those following my Instagram see this regularly – I never use the same deck twice in a row for my daily draws.

A comparison of the Two of Cups from the Centennial Waite-Smith and the Gilded Tarot.

A comparison of the Two of Cups from the Centennial Waite-Smith and the Gilded Tarot. Both are RWS decks, but they have completely different visual representations for the core ideas. We can use that.

Another thing? Every time I pull a card from a deck for daily draws I consult the book. Even if I’m already super familiar with the deck. Sometimes a word or phrase jumps out of the description, encouraging me to focus on that particular aspect for interpretation. It also sometimes helps me see new facets of the card I hadn’t before considered. I highly recommend it.

Change Up the Deck Style

Using a different RWS deck every day, while helpful, will only take us so far. Up the difficulty and increase results by changing deck styles as well. Use an RWS deck one day and follow it up with a New Approaches deck the next. Toss some Thoth or TdM up in there, or even some Visconti, to keep it fresh and stretch your skills. I’ve personally found TdM and Visconti decks to be transformative to the way I read Tarot, and using them for occasional daily draws is a great way to ease into these new systems.

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot.

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot. Each one has such a different take on the core meaning that becoming familiar with them increases our connection to ALL of them.

Use Quotations

This technique ties phrases to card meanings, making it particularly useful for more auditory learners. Draw a card, think about what it means, and find a famous quote that fits the meaning. Pondering a quote instead of a card image or string of keywords engages our minds in a whole new way.

Finding the perfect quotation can sometimes take more time than we have, though. Don’t despair – there’s a deck for that! The Art of Life Tarot is based on general RWS meanings, but it matches up a piece of fine art and a well-known quotation for a truly unique approach to Tarot. Consider the below pic a teaser for my forthcoming review!

The Two of Cups from the Art of Life Tarot.

The Two of Cups from the Art of Life Tarot.

Write a Haiku

This adds a creative twist to the daily draw. It works on the same principles as using quotations, but instead of finding a suitable quote we write a haiku. In my opinion, this technique encourages a much more personal relationship with each card.

Haikus are a Japanese form of poetry with a rigidly set structure of three lines. The first is 5 syllables, the second is 7, and the third is 5. Capitalization and punctuation are left up to the author. They also generally don’t rhyme.

My haiku for the Two of Cups.

I  JUST started posting these on Instagram. Feel free to join me using the #haikuthetarot hashtag! You can also follow my IG – I’m @mystiknomad.

Writing a haiku for each card of the Tarot forces us to play with different ways of expressing the core meaning of each card. We can’t rely on keywords to do it, either, which is a fantastic way of breaking out of book bound interpretations.

A huge bonus of this technique is that it stays fresh regardless of how many times we cycle through the deck. Trust me – the haikus will be entirely different with each go round!

This technique is equally effective when we use one deck the whole way through or change the deck by the day.

Participate in Tarot Challenges

Both Instagram users and Facebook groups set up Tarot challenges to be done in groups. Usually lasting for a calendar month and often based around a specific theme, the idea is to meet a daily challenge for as long as challenge lasts.

The Tarot Nerds Challenge for March 2017.

My first official challenge was in March with the Tarot Nerds Facebook group. I had so much fun sharing my answers with other people doing the same thing!

This can be an excellent way of focusing on cards in new and exciting ways, because the challenges change each month. Some folks even do more than one at a time! Posting our results on Instagram or Facebook also lets us share our draws with others responding to the same question. That can introduce us to different interpretations of the cards, new decks we’ve never seen before, and the wider Tarot community as a whole. Participation provides its own kind of accountability, too, by reminding us to do them every day.

Use Two Cards

Want to get into something more spread-like? Pull two cards for your Daily Draw instead of one. It seems like such an obvious thing, but it can really push us to see the cards as interconnected energies instead of discrete ideas.

The picture below shows some possible layout options using the same two cards. Doesn’t that second card add so many options for interpretation?

Two card layout possibilities using the stunning Prisma Visions Tarot.

Two card layout possibilities using the stunning Prisma Visions Tarot. The first lays them out in a linear fashion. The second uses the second card as a clarification of the first, a way to focus the first’s meaning on a particular area or in a particular direction. The third layout is the core of the Celtic Cross, letting us see the day’s theme and something that might be challenging that.

As a bonus, adding a second card doesn’t require much more time/energy investment than a single card would!

If even that’s not enough we could stretch it to a three-card reading, but to my mind that feels like a little much for a daily draw.

And there we have it – a range of ways to make daily draws more interesting and relevant to our daily lives!

Have you tried any of these? Does anything look interesting? Will you be joining me as I #haikuthetarot? Let me know in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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9 thoughts on “Rethinking Daily Tarot Draws

  1. TPWard says:

    One technique suggested to me is draw in the morning, look only at night while reflecting on the day to see what connects.

    • Caer Jones says:

      I’ve seen that one too. So many approaches are possible with daily draws! Which one works best for you?

      • TPWard says:

        Right now it’s mostly a feeling of “gah!” when I remember that I forgot 😦

      • Caer Jones says:

        *laugh* I totally get that! I’m getting ever deeper into planner layouts and have a space for them. I also find that posting them to Instagram helps me remember. Have you tried either approach? I find them super helpful!

      • TPWard says:

        The real issue for me is that I have offerings to make in the mornings, and adding more to the mix can eat up a lot of time. I’m trying to figure out what I could be giving up to make room, since divination has been suggested as a priority.

      • Caer Jones says:

        *wince* Yeah, that’s challenging! Best of luck!

  2. […] via Rethinking Daily Tarot Draws — MystikNomad […]

  3. thetiph says:

    These are some really good ideas. Recently, I had a similar ennui about pulling daily cards, and I switched it to “what do I need to know about today,” but these other ideas are great ways to keep expanding and engaging with the cards. Thanks!!

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