Prayer Ritual Basics

Since posting about my upcoming Prayer Ritual I’ve gotten several requests for a how-to guide. I figured the best place to start would be an explanation from the one who inspired me to do this, Stevie Miller over at Feathers in Amber. She graciously provided the below explanation and photos of her techniques. One of the things I most like about her practice is that she’s not afraid to experiment with different approaches, so you’ve quite a few examples to start with! I’ll be following with my approach in the next few days.

Starting an Open Prayer Ceremony
Stevie Miller

If you have spent any amount of time on social media–and really, who hasn’t?–you’ve probably seen a surprising amount of people asking for prayers. It might not occur to you, as it didn’t for me, until you start looking for it, but these requests are everywhere: sick and injured friends and family, job searches, hurting relationships, house fires, cars breaking down. In a circle of just a couple hundred people, things like this can be going wrong every day.

As a spirit worker, I seem to have something of an “on duty” sign that lights up when people specifically ask for prayer. Even if the people making the request are from different traditions than mine, or outside of polytheism altogether, I often feel moved to help. But since I didn’t want to impose my beliefs on others, I wanted to come up with a way to figure out who wanted that kind of help from me, and how I could offer it on a regular basis without it taking over my life.

A simple prayer ritual to Odin with an offering of mead and incense.

A simple altar layout for a prayer ritual, featuring an offering of mead and incense.

Enter the weekly open prayer ceremony. I let people know that I will be lighting candles and reading out petitions once a week and that I’m open to requests. Suddenly, those requests came flooding in from every direction–more than I even had candles for! People loved the idea, and I even got asked if others could pray for me in return, and if I wanted donations to be offered to any charities in return for this sacred work. I was also asked to write the article you’re reading now.

I also found that this practice has benefitted me. The routine is fantastic for ensuring that I’m offering to and talking to my Powers regularly. Social accountability–that is, other people expecting that you’re going to do something, and your posting evidence of it–is great for establishing and maintaining a good habit. It has also made me feel much more connected to others. Spirit work, especially when you serve a really niche tribe–and in my case, a discarnate, non-human tribe–can be an extremely lonely path. But with this, I’m using my skills to do good for others, and hearing back about how it has helped them. It has been starting to make me feel like I really do have a community, and they need me.

This picture shows the Odin candle, an offering of mead on top of a prayer list, and a piece of knot magick representing all the prayers made.

This picture shows the Odin candle, an offering of mead on top of a prayer list, and a piece of knot magick representing all the prayers made. She kept the cord on the altar for a week so that the Gods could watch over everyone’s intentions.

The Gods, Ancestors, and Spirits seem to enjoy being needed too. I’ve consistently gotten messages over the years, both intended for myself and intended for others, along the lines of “Ask Us! Come to Us when you are in need! We want to be a part of your lives and your works. You don’t need to do this all alone.” Calling on the Powers regularly for the people has strengthened my bond with Them too.

I wholeheartedly believe the world will be a better place when more of us are praying for each other and offering to the Powers. So if you’d like to start an open prayer ceremony of your own–which I would strongly encourage!–I’d like to offer some tips.

Define your community: Maybe you just want to open your ceremony to people close to you, or maybe you want to make it public. I post publicly on social media about it, and, odd exceptions aside, accept every prayer petition I receive. You may want to do it differently. Whatever you choose, figure out who you’re offering this service to and how you will let them know about it. An alternative is to simply gather up the prayer requests you see and hear in day to day life. You’ll be surprised how many you encounter once you start looking for them.

Set your boundaries: What Powers do you want to work with? Will you let people request prayers to a specific deity or spirit? What kinds of prayer requests will you accept? When will you accept prayer requests? What is your maximum capacity? These are all things you will need to define for yourself and your audience if you’re going to do open prayer ceremonies.

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A beautiful altar layout utilizing nine candles to represent the collective prayers said. Note the rune stones in front of the candles – she drew a general omen for everyone she prayed for and shared the results.

Create your ritual: I’ve found that it’s easiest for me to deal with open requests if I keep my ritual format simple. I do a simple invocation, I make offerings to the Powers I have invoked, I read the petitions of the people while lighting candles, and I thank the Powers for Their blessings. Sometimes I will add a component where I take an omen, such as a three rune pull or a card draw, or a component where I meditate and listen to see if the Powers have any messages for just me personally or for all the people being prayed for. That’s it.

Distance offerings: Since I’m praying for people who are scattered all over the country, I took up a practice that seems to be gaining popularity in polytheist circles: I promote offerings to charity in the name of the deity being honored that week. For example, the last couple times that I have worked with Odin, He has made it clear that He would like offerings in His name to be made to Alzheimer’s research. This allows people who are not present at your ceremony to take part if they feel so moved by giving something in exchange. Reciprocity is important in many traditions. It also helps you work on causes your Powers find important, which can only improve your devotional relationships, right?

Simplify: I keep the whole process simple because it’s easier for me to focus on the petitions, and to keep this process going without getting burnt out. For example, you don’t have to light an individual candle for every single petition. I sometimes use 9 which is a symbolically important number in my tradition; for many 3 is also a sacred number.

An image of nine tealights arranged in a pattern centered on an Odin jar candle.

Miller’s use of nine candles during a prayer ritual.

Offerings can be low key, like a nice beverage or some incense. I use Wednesday as my day of the week because that day is named after my Patron Odin (“Woden’s Day”). Keeping it on the same day each week makes it easier for me to remember (I’m lucky if I know what day it is!) and also makes it easy for people to know when their prayer requests need to get to me by.

After my prayer ceremony is over, I usually share a quick snapshot of the lit up altar just to let people know that their petitions have been spoken. I’ll share any commentary that I have from the rite itself, especially if I took an omen and want to share my reading of it.

In the future, I plan to work with different Powers and offer prayer ceremonies focused on particular intents, such as healing and abundance. I’m hoping to foster connections between people and deities or spirits they may not be as familiar with too.

I hope that this has been helpful and that you are inspired to start your own open prayer ceremony! Blessings to you and your communities.

The ADF’s Statement on #Charlottesville

Back in December 2014 I shared the very tepid official statement from Covenant of the Goddess on police violence, and my rewriting of it.

Ár nDraíocht Féin: A Druid Fellowship (ADF) released a very different kind of statement in response to #Charlottesville.

I have included it below in its entirety:

From the ADF Mother Grove:

Last Saturday violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia. Neo-Nazis and
white-supremacists marched in the name of hate, intolerance, and violence.
Heather Heyer, one of the many counter-protestors, died standing up to
these monsters and many others were injured when a car was deliberately
driven into the crowd.

We as a nation and a world stood up to Nazi ideology more than 70 years
ago, and defeated it with the mentality that we would never see it return
to power. Fast forward to today, and we see these racists no longer living
in the shadows and causing violence, mayhem, fear, and death.

In response to this senseless tragedy, ADF’s Member’s Advocate reached out
to those members local to Charlottesville and made sure they were safe. We
will continue to work toward an inclusive environment and welcome people
from all walks of life, ethnic origins, and races.

As a safe haven and a pagan church, ADF denounces the actions by these
racists on not only on Saturday, August 12, but we denounce all of their
past and future rallies of hate. We stand against their ideology of racism
and intolerance. We condemn these groups for appropriating our ancestor’s
symbols for their own nefarious uses. As a church which uses Indo-European
myth and symbology in our worship, we want to be clear that we stand
opposed to these hate groups.  We as a church we stand together with all
the other pagan groups and churches in denouncing these white nationalists,
and together we will work to prevent this cancer from ever returning.
___________________________________________________________

Now that is a statement. Clear, concise, definitive, firm, and calls it all out by name. Well done ADF!

Eclipse/New Moon Prayer Ritual

I’ve been inspired by Stevie Miller over at Grundsau Burrow. She’s been holding regular formal prayer rituals of late and I think that’s a damn fine idea. I’m hopping on the bandwagon and joining in. In these trying times we need all the help we can get!

That being so, when better than the coming solar eclipse? I’ll be continuing this practice on every new moon for the foreseeable future, but this seems like a great time to start!

solar-eclipse-clouds

This is an open call for prayers to be ritually made on your behalf on August 21st. If you would like to participate, please let me know your name and what you’re praying for so I can add you to the list and do the prep work. You can comment here, tag me on Facebook, PM me, email me, whatever makes you comfy. And feel free to share! I’m taking the whole day off to make this happen, so let’s get it rolling!

I will stop accepting prayer requests at 5:30a EST, August 21st.

*Note: I reserve the right to refuse prayers for anything I find ethically dodgy. Thank you for your understanding.

The Virtue of Courage

In the wake of #Charlottesville my Facebook feed has been overflowing with folks shocked and outraged by both the eruption of violence (although anyone surprised hasn’t been paying attention) and the fact that Nazis are once again an active public force in 2017.


Don’t think it was straight-up Nazis, or don’t know what went down? Here’s an on-the-ground look. Disturbing footage – you have been warned. 

I’m assuming that everyone reading this post is firmly in the “Nazis are Bad” camp, so I’m not going to belabor that point. I also don’t want to overtalk the POC and Jewish folks who need the floor right now.

However, I would like to discuss a tangential issue that keeps coming up: the guilt many are feeling because they’re not out on the front lines clashing with Nazis face-to-face, shedding blood for the cause.

Examples abound. “I wish I could protest, but I’m not able-bodied and wouldn’t be able to physically protect myself.” Or, “I would be out there, but I have two young children and can’t leave them without a parent if I’m arrested/injured/murdered.” Or, “I’m sorry, but I can’t get off of work to protest without losing my job!” It’s like they feel lacking in some way, like they’re not being courageous enough, and they’re apologizing for it.

Let’s unpack that.

What is courage, anyway? 

Courage is a virtue honored by every Pagan/polytheist path I can name. Even beyond that, though, we’re all the heroes of our own stories, and when the chips are down we picture ourselves as heroes. Or even superheroes. And if – when – we fall short of being the heroes we think we should be we beat ourselves up for it.

A poster from the Wonder Woman movie with the tagline

Hero: One person, or a member of a very small group, advancing relentlessly in the face of an overwhelming force, armed with the strength of their convictions and protected by the blessings of the Gods.

It wasn’t always like that, though. Ancient polytheists valued courage too. Thing is, they defined courage differently than we tend to, and that naturally manifested in a different view of heroes.

Here, this says it better than I can:

“Aristotle describes each virtue as a mean between extremes. Courage, for example, is a mean between cowardice, on the one hand, and rashness on the other.

“To be courageous is neither to shrink from your best action on account of fear, nor to foolishly go into danger when no good is likely to come from your doing so. This means that what is courageous for one person may actually be cowardly for another, and rash for a third, depending on the abilities and situations of the individuals. For a small seven-year-old to fight a large eight-year-old bully may be courageous, when it would be cowardly for an adult to act in the same manner, and rash for a four-year-old to do so.

“The key to determining the mean in the case of courage is deliberation about what good is threatened, what options one has to protect that good, and what the likely outcome will be using the different options. The course of action which does not sacrifice the good to fear, when one has a likelihood of protecting it by taking action, is the mean between the extremes of cowardice and rashness, and hence is the courageous one.”

Deborah Kest, Right Action – A Pagan Perspective, ADF

By those standards, Wonder Woman was courageous. As a superhero, her charge could conceivably make a real difference and she didn’t let fear stop her from making the attempt. Anyone attempting to emulate her would be considered rash, though, because they would have immediately died on the field without accomplishing anything. That doesn’t make everyone not Wonder Woman a failure, it just makes them human.

Ancient heroes were often blessed in some way, demigods or magical or whatever. They could do things beyond the human. That’s what made them heroes. Those of us without those blessings could never hope to measure up. Which is fine – we weren’t expected to.

In the ancient world, heroic deeds were inspirational benchmarks, not standards to be met.

Most of us are more prone to caution than recklessness, right? Were I somewhere with bullets flying I’d be way more likely to hunker in my bunker than charge screaming across a battlefield. Thinking of Wonder Woman might be the inspiration I needed to act instead of being paralyzed by fear.

On the other hand, if I were prone to being reckless? To not thinking things through? Those in the bunker would be inspirational, because that extreme would be the harder one for me to reach.

True courage lies between hunkering down and brazenly charging down the throat of a stronger foe. Hitting either extreme means we’re missing the mark. Courage is the sweet spot in the middle.

Nazis win if we quietly keep to our bunkers. They also win if all those protesting them die in the doing. No matter which extreme we’re talking about we wind up with no one kicking Nazi ass. And who wants that?

Courageous Responses to Nazis

Each of us has our own mean, our own courage sweet spot, based on our own individual circumstances. We simply have to find it.

It can be hard to find that sweet spot in the moment, though. If we’re hardwired to hide we’ll do that by default until we have time and space to process. If we’re more prone to lash out we’ll do that until we can rein it in. Our instinctive responses will happen before our brains can catch up.

Martial artists are familiar with this phenomenon. That’s why they practice the same moves over and over until they become instinctual. They’re deliberately rewiring their brains so that the training overrides their instincts.

We can do the same thing when it comes to courageous action. While most of us don’t want to live a life where crisis becomes routine, it does help to work out our logic trees in advance of a crisis. When it comes to Us vs. Nazis, we’re better off if we’ve at least grappled with the theory a little before we go about putting ourselves in harm’s way.

So let’s grapple with Aristotle.

1. What “good” is being threatened? What are we protecting?

Bam.

An image of people throwing the Hitler salute on one side and the Statue of Liberty on the other. The caption is

I can’t make it any plainer.

Nazis directly and violently threaten our communities, our friends and neighbors, our families, and ourselves. They’re fascist, racist, sexist, ableist, xenophobic, and homophobic. Many of the homegrown version are theocratic, too. I don’t know about you, but damn near everyone I know falls somewhere on their hit list. All of those targeted groups need to be protected.

On a greater level, the Nazi threat radiates beyond our communities onto the world stage, especially considering the power America wields. Imagine the might of the US military in the hands of Steve Bannon and his fanboys.

With courageous action against Nazis we can help protect every citizen on earth. That’s a pretty important thing to do!

2. What are our options? What can we do to protect what we value against Nazis?

There’s a whole wide range of responses we could make here, from deciding to “focus on happier things than politics” to “drawing and quartering every Nazi we find”. I don’t find either of these options to be ethical (and I hope my readers don’t either!), so I’m not going to discuss them. That said, what are some ethical things we can do?

  • Show up ready and willing to physically throw down with Nazis in public protests.
  • Serve as support for those physically protesting (supply bottled water and food, disperse information for planned protests, host planning meetings, offer crash space for those coming in from out of town, offer transportation, offer a safe retreat option if things go south, help protestors network, etc.).
  • Take classes in de-escalation tactics and first aid and/or help other people get trained.
  • Learn self-defense and/or teach it to others.
  • Help protesters and targeted groups with self-care or networking.
  • Step in when witnessing a one-on-one case of Nazis harassment, or call the cops if stepping in isn’t advisable for whatever reason.
  • Show up to speak out against Nazis in public forums, knowing violence is unlikely but possible.
  • Speak out against Nazis in face-to-face situations unlikely to lead to violence, such as with family and friends, knowing you’re risking those relationships.
  • Actively amplify the voices of those targeted by Nazis.
  • Cut ties to those who espouse Nazi views, letting them know why you’re cutting those ties.
  • Make your anti-Nazi stance knows to employers, both your own and those with whom you do business.
  • Make your anti-Nazi stance known to the employers of known Nazis and the companies with whom they do business (hotels, web servers, gyms, restaurants, etc).
  • Write letters to your government representatives linking your anti-Nazi stance to recent events.
  • Speak out against Nazis online, knowing that doxxing and other types of reprisals are possible.
  • Speak out against Nazis online anonymously.
  • Refuse to let Nazis rebrand themselves, or apologists to do it for them. Call out Nazis where you find them as Nazis, without using whatever more palatable term they come up with. (Notice how many times I specifically say “Nazi” in this post? There’s a reason for that.)
  • Write, sing, dance, paint, and put on theatrical productions that show how bad Nazis are – there’s certainly PLENTY to work with!
  • Recommend those creative works to others and support the creators.
  • Form a book club to collectively read and discuss pertinent works (The Diary of Anne Frank, The Hiding Place, and Number the Stars are all classic options).
  • Prepare hidden rooms in your home or on your property to hide victims of potential purges without posting that shit online! (An extreme, I know, but it is an option for any upcoming dystopian hellscape… ).
  • Get passports for you and yours in case you need to leave the country as a result of doing any of the above.
  • Leave the country to ensure the safety of yourself and your dependents while continuing to speak out against Nazis from the outside.

Please notice that these options aren’t mutually exclusive. It’s also not an exhaustive list.

3. What are the likely outcomes/consequences of taking these options? What are the likely rewards?  

There’s no hard and fast answer to this because every person’s circumstances are different. Publicly stating anti-Nazi views in cosmopolitan New York has a very different range of likely consequences and rewards than doing the same in, say, Middle-of-Nowhere Oregon!

Keep in mind that the key word of this whole step is “likely”. Sure, we could catch Ebola tomorrow, but it’s not a likely scenario and we shouldn’t plan our lives around the possibility. However, that means that part of being courageous is staying informed. How do we know if something’s likely or not if we refuse to see what’s really happening around us? Information is power, always, and in this case information helps us make the best choices possible.

By confining our options to “likely” we improve our chances of finding that happy spot between “letting fear guide our steps” and “being reckless with our health and safety”.

Consider too that Nazis are making the same decisions we are, with the same consequence/reward balance. Factoring that in helps us more accurately judge a given action’s effectiveness. Besides, discouraging Nazis from being Nazis is its own reward.

4. What is the best action I could take when protesting Nazis? Which option demonstrates true courage?  

Something I find fascinating about Aristotle’s breakdown is that, by his standards, our feelings about it don’t really matter. We can feel scared or cocky or anything in between, and that’s fine. Courage relies on what we do, not how we feel about that choice. That’s why the article quoted above is titled “Right Action” instead of “Right Feeling”.

A courageous act is one that is the best choice available for the greatest good possible from a given set of options, regardless of our fear or lack thereof. It’s less berserker and more chess master.

And that leaves room for all of us to courageously protest Nazis to the best of our abilities and circumstances, with the only shame being the refusal to try.

May we all try our best.

To the Resistance!

Rethinking Daily Tarot Draws

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot.

The Daily Tarot Draw is a ubiquitous practice in the Tarot community. It’s commonly recommended as a learning tool for those new to Tarot, and even more advanced folks often pull a card for direction or inspiration every morning. It’s an easy way to bring Tarot into our daily lives.

The technique is simple: we draw a card in the morning and ponder it throughout our day. Then, before sleep, we jot down the results of our pondering. In this way we focus on the cards one by one, allowing us to dig deeper into their meanings.

My Instagram post for the Two of Cups from Das Delphische Tarot, the German version of the Mythic Tarot.

My Instagram post for the Two of Cups from Das Delphische Tarot, the German version of the Mythic Tarot.

I’ve long been a fan of the Daily Draw, but over time I started getting less and less out of it.  Daily draws moved from “ooh, what could this mean today?” to “ah, better prep for that then!”. Questions became statements, and I grew bored.

I think that’s perfectly normal. The better we know the cards the less likely we are to question their meaning, right? Unfortunately, it’s the questioning aspect that makes this such a useful learning technique in the first place!

Thankfully, all it takes is a little twist to make the Daily Draw once again useful for even the most advanced Tarot students. Here are a few of my suggestions.

Change the Question

Most of us, when we do our daily reads, ask general questions about ourselves. “What do I need to know today?” “What situations do I need to prepare for?” “How will my event go?”

As an alternative, ask more specific questions about topics outside of ourselves. “What news story should I pay particular attention to today?” “What weather should I prepare for?” “What’s today’s office vibe?” Treat the one card draw as a mini-spread related to something specific and then record your results afterward. Stretch your limits and see how it goes!

Change the Deck (and Consult the Book!)

It’s easy for us to get so comfortable with an established deck that we stop really thinking about it. The fastest and easiest way to shake it up is to simply start working with a new deck. Those following my Instagram see this regularly – I never use the same deck twice in a row for my daily draws.

A comparison of the Two of Cups from the Centennial Waite-Smith and the Gilded Tarot.

A comparison of the Two of Cups from the Centennial Waite-Smith and the Gilded Tarot. Both are RWS decks, but they have completely different visual representations for the core ideas. We can use that.

Another thing? Every time I pull a card from a deck for daily draws I consult the book. Even if I’m already super familiar with the deck. Sometimes a word or phrase jumps out of the description, encouraging me to focus on that particular aspect for interpretation. It also sometimes helps me see new facets of the card I hadn’t before considered. I highly recommend it.

Change Up the Deck Style

Using a different RWS deck every day, while helpful, will only take us so far. Up the difficulty and increase results by changing deck styles as well. Use an RWS deck one day and follow it up with a New Approaches deck the next. Toss some Thoth or TdM up in there, or even some Visconti, to keep it fresh and stretch your skills. I’ve personally found TdM and Visconti decks to be transformative to the way I read Tarot, and using them for occasional daily draws is a great way to ease into these new systems.

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot.

The Centennial Two of Cups next to the same card from the Thoth Tarot and the Marseille Cat Tarot. Each one has such a different take on the core meaning that becoming familiar with them increases our connection to ALL of them.

Use Quotations

This technique ties phrases to card meanings, making it particularly useful for more auditory learners. Draw a card, think about what it means, and find a famous quote that fits the meaning. Pondering a quote instead of a card image or string of keywords engages our minds in a whole new way.

Finding the perfect quotation can sometimes take more time than we have, though. Don’t despair – there’s a deck for that! The Art of Life Tarot is based on general RWS meanings, but it matches up a piece of fine art and a well-known quotation for a truly unique approach to Tarot. Consider the below pic a teaser for my forthcoming review!

The Two of Cups from the Art of Life Tarot.

The Two of Cups from the Art of Life Tarot.

Write a Haiku

This adds a creative twist to the daily draw. It works on the same principles as using quotations, but instead of finding a suitable quote we write a haiku. In my opinion, this technique encourages a much more personal relationship with each card.

Haikus are a Japanese form of poetry with a rigidly set structure of three lines. The first is 5 syllables, the second is 7, and the third is 5. Capitalization and punctuation are left up to the author. They also generally don’t rhyme.

My haiku for the Two of Cups.

I  JUST started posting these on Instagram. Feel free to join me using the #haikuthetarot hashtag! You can also follow my IG – I’m @mystiknomad.

Writing a haiku for each card of the Tarot forces us to play with different ways of expressing the core meaning of each card. We can’t rely on keywords to do it, either, which is a fantastic way of breaking out of book bound interpretations.

A huge bonus of this technique is that it stays fresh regardless of how many times we cycle through the deck. Trust me – the haikus will be entirely different with each go round!

This technique is equally effective when we use one deck the whole way through or change the deck by the day.

Participate in Tarot Challenges

Both Instagram users and Facebook groups set up Tarot challenges to be done in groups. Usually lasting for a calendar month and often based around a specific theme, the idea is to meet a daily challenge for as long as challenge lasts.

The Tarot Nerds Challenge for March 2017.

My first official challenge was in March with the Tarot Nerds Facebook group. I had so much fun sharing my answers with other people doing the same thing!

This can be an excellent way of focusing on cards in new and exciting ways, because the challenges change each month. Some folks even do more than one at a time! Posting our results on Instagram or Facebook also lets us share our draws with others responding to the same question. That can introduce us to different interpretations of the cards, new decks we’ve never seen before, and the wider Tarot community as a whole. Participation provides its own kind of accountability, too, by reminding us to do them every day.

Use Two Cards

Want to get into something more spread-like? Pull two cards for your Daily Draw instead of one. It seems like such an obvious thing, but it can really push us to see the cards as interconnected energies instead of discrete ideas.

The picture below shows some possible layout options using the same two cards. Doesn’t that second card add so many options for interpretation?

Two card layout possibilities using the stunning Prisma Visions Tarot.

Two card layout possibilities using the stunning Prisma Visions Tarot. The first lays them out in a linear fashion. The second uses the second card as a clarification of the first, a way to focus the first’s meaning on a particular area or in a particular direction. The third layout is the core of the Celtic Cross, letting us see the day’s theme and something that might be challenging that.

As a bonus, adding a second card doesn’t require much more time/energy investment than a single card would!

If even that’s not enough we could stretch it to a three-card reading, but to my mind that feels like a little much for a daily draw.

And there we have it – a range of ways to make daily draws more interesting and relevant to our daily lives!

Have you tried any of these? Does anything look interesting? Will you be joining me as I #haikuthetarot? Let me know in the comments!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Wanderer’s Spread

The name of this blog isn’t an accident. I am a mystik nomad. I travel as often as possible, to as many places as possible, reveling in the unique song my soul sings in each new location and learning something new everywhere I roam.

It sometimes feels like I’m spoiled for choice, though. There are so many places to go, so much to see, so much to do! How can I ever pick?

So I made a spread for that.

The Wanderer's Spread, designed to help you choose your next adventure!

The Wanderer’s Spread, designed to help you choose your next adventure!

The Wanderer’s Spread helps us see what types of experiences we might have at a given place at a given time. When choosing where to go, simply lay out cards for each possibility and then compare. Then make the arrangements and head out!

The cards can go down in any order, but I start at the 3 o’clock/East position and work my way around clockwise. Start wherever makes the most sense for you.

1) What might this destination do to or for my mind?

Every new place we go stimulates our minds in different ways. Some are mentally exciting, causing our attention to ping-pong from bright light to bright light like a squirrel on speed. Think Disneyland, or the Vegas Strip. Others still our minds, turn us inwards, encourage us to reflect and consider. An example for this would be quietly drinking coffee at dawn from a cabin porch. Which is this trip likely to offer?

2) What might this destination do to or for my body?

Is this trip likely to be relaxing and restorative? Adrenalin-filled and active? Sore and uncomfortable? All have their place – what are you in the mood for?

3) What might this destination do to or for my heart?

Every trip is a journey of the heart as much as anything else. Is this particular journey full of joy? Unexpected love? Anger and rage? Despair? Cleansing and renewal? This is your chance to tailor your destination to meet the needs of your emotional self.

4) What might this destination do to or for my spirit? 

Every place has its own spirit, its own frequency, its own voice. Each one of them resonates with our souls in unique ways, and between them they create a song unlike any other that can be heard by anyone anywhere. What kind of song does this place sing to your spirit? Is it the kind of song you want to hear?

Lay out as many different spreads as you have options. Nothing’s likely to be perfect, of course, but which options best suit you and which tradeoffs are you most willing to make?

This spread can add a whole new dimension to your trip planning! Do it ahead of time, record your results, and compare them to how you feel when you get home. It could help you examine things in a whole new way!

Online Class on Ritual Construction

Thista Minai is a dear friend of mine, a nationally-known educator and Ordeal facilitator, and author of the forthcoming “Casting a Queer Circle – Non-Binary Witchcraft”. She’s also running rituals around the country for 100+ people on the regular. (Seriously, her travel schedule is insane.)

The cover for the soon-to-be-available Casting a Queer Circle.

The cover for the soon-to-be-available Casting a Queer Circle. I am SO EXCITED to see this book published, y’all. So much yummy goodness inside!

When it comes to ritual construction she knows what she’s talking about and has a resume to back it up.

She loves teaching her approach to ritual construction, too, so other people can learn first-hand the tricks and tips that work. Thing is, most events don’t really have a demand for ritual construction classes. They’re looking for more beginner/intermediate stuff, and this class is a little too specialized and advanced for that.

We started talking about it yesterday and I mentioned wanting to take her Essential Ritual Construction class myself. Always good to pick up new skills and approaches, right? And chatting about it over tea just isn’t the same. We tossed some ideas around, and she’s willing to offer an online class (probably through something like Udemy) if there’s enough interest.

So. Is there enough interest? Would you (or your group) be willing to invest a few bucks and an evening of your time to attend an online class on Essential Ritual Construction?

Here’s the blurb from her website:

Essential Ritual Design

What does it take to create meaningful ritual? In this nondenominational workshop, we will explore ritual’s essential components, and discuss what makes a ritual ‘good’. We will examine both practical and spiritual considerations in designing and executing effective ritual for groups small and large, public and private, traditional and eclectic.

Comment here or PM me if you’re interested. And feel free to share! This is a more advanced-level topic, and it can be hard to find resources that go into the nuts and bolts of it. Let’s work on getting more of those resources out there for those who want/need them!

Note: Queer Witchcraft is now available here.